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March 12, 2018 | by  | in *News* News Splash |
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Young Nats Interpret “No” as a Violation of Their Human Rights

Unaccustomed to and confused by the word “no”, the Young Nats of Nelson have literally  lodged a complaint with the Human Rights Commission because they weren’t allowed a stall at O-Week.

The youth wing of the National Party, which provides a youth perspective to the extremely mainstream and well-represented fiscally-liberal view, is “mad as hell”, according to one source Salient spoke to.

Bypassing reasonable convention via discussion with the Student Association of Nelson-Marlborough Institute of Technology Incorporated, who “pulled the pin” on all political stalls during O-Week in Nelson due to organisational constraints, the Nelson Young Nats chairman John Gibson apparently thought the matter was a genuine infringement on his human rights, calling the move “unlawful discrimination”.

When reached for comment, one National voter and multiple home owner said, “Wow, I’ve never heard of this, but good on Gibson for refusing to accept anything less than complete compliance”.

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