Viewport width =

Issue 12, 2018

Issue 12, Volume 81: Each To Their Own

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

News

  • Law Students’ Privacy Breached

  • Ireland Repeals Abortion Ban

  • Trump’s America: Former Reality TV Star Donald Trump Isn’t A Very Good President

  • Updates on Kylie Jenner’s Baby

  • Trump the Flip-Flop

  • Tuatara to Assume Larger Role in Student Life

  • Trash & Dash

  • Underground Artisan Tobacco Culture Emerges with Plain Packaging

  • Formula One Season Heating Up for Some

  • Queer Coverage: Local, National, and International LGBTQIA+ News

  • New Zealand Not Quite Paradise for Queer Asians

  • Diss Tracks Are Poetry, Just Admit You Have A Crush

  • Harsh Criticism to Auckland University Library Restructure

  • Features

  • Love Isn’t Real, Because You Aren’t Hard Enough

    I’m 16. The clock hits 9:30pm and my mother tells me to get to bed and get an early night. My lamp lights up the room that was previously lit up by Minecraft and my phone alerting me that someone poked me. The rain begin to hit my window as I turn on my speaker […]

    by

  • Dehydration is the Enemy

    Dehydration is the enemy. This is my life motto, mostly because I haven’t yet had a meaningful enough life experience to warrant something as cliché as a proper life motto. Nevertheless, dehydration is a problem I face every day when I come to uni, and that is because there are not enough drinking fountains. Every […]

    by

  • Polarising Opinions

    There is something very easy about extremities: it’s the comfort that comes with treating “right” and “wrong” as if they are unquestionable, unshakable truths. It’s the relief of being able to point the finger at someone else, identify the problem, the enemy as “other” and, in doing so, absolve oneself of blame. It feels good […]

    by

  • Rants On Driving

    Let’s talk about anxiety and driving for a hot minute. Now I grew up driving in Hamilton, and the Hamil-hole provided some excellent space for crafting up my skills and doing wheelies. This being said, upon moving to Wellington, I missed the freedom of driving everywhere. Needless to say, I grew to love walking around […]

    by

  • “fuck off you have an opinion on everything”

    While I have gained a bit of a reputation for being opinionated, I do have an attention span best suited to 280 characters. Bearing in mind that I have never once in my life been wrong, these are the hills that I am willing to die on: Sweet things should not be served with dinner. […]

    by

  • Like A Banana: Peeling Back the Meaning of Crazy Rich Asians

    The trailer for Crazy Rich Asians dropped a few weeks ago, claiming a star-studded cast, including Constance Wu (Fresh Off the Boat), Harry Shum Jnr (Glee; Shadowhunters), and Awkwafina (Ocean’s 8). But more importantly, it’s a 100% Asian cast – the first of its kind in Hollywood in over 20 years. Maybe my standards are […]

    by

  • NOTE TO LOUISE // SALLY: THE TRACK CHANGES THAT I MAKE INDEPENDENTLY ON THIS I WOULD LIKE TO BE PUBLISHED IN THE MAGAZINE FOR VISUAL EFFECT.

    It’s 2am. A drunken sprawl of words and clothes on the right hand side of my bed. I lay on my bed, feeling like I gave myself excuses for incoherency. Another night with full intention but no method of actualising said desires. I knew all too well what I wanted to write about, how I […]

    by

  • Work for Free? Yeah Right

    You study, learn, do an internship perhaps – then you graduate. Want a paid gig? Nah man, but perhaps you can help me on a project and I’ll introduce you to a few guys… Fuck that! Exterior, Melling Station, mid-afternoon I run into the train with a puffy black jacket, which makes me look like […]

    by

  • The Myth of Science

    I’ve been thinking a lot about what science means to broader culture today. When I hear people say “I believe in science!” or wearing a “Science! It Works!” shirt, I always want to ask them: What do you mean when you say “science”? What do you think science does? What is your myth of science? […]

    by

  • Memes Are No Joke

    Why am I petrified at the outset of this article? Why do my hands tremble above the keys, knuckles sweating, joints weak? I think it’s because I am about to be… sincere. That is quite a scary thing to attempt to do in this day and age, to talk seriously about something that you care […]

    by

  • Fact of the Day

    CW: suicide, depression & sexual assault 28/05/2018 Dear Louise, It’s the Opinions issue next week! Awesome. I love hearing what people think. I told my friend this issue was coming up and she said “isn’t every issue of Salient an opinions issue?” — obviously you and I know the difference, but the wider student population […]

    by

  • What’s Your Opinion?

    Originally I wasn’t planning to write an opinion piece at all. It felt a bit greedy to write one when I get an editorial every week. But our designer Ruby said to me, “you’re the editor, you should. I’m doing one even though I can’t write for shit”. And here I am. Guys, I tried […]

    by

  • Love Isn’t Real, Because You Aren’t Hard Enough

    I’m 16. The clock hits 9:30pm and my mother tells me to get to bed and get an early night. My lamp lights up the room that was previously lit up by Minecraft and my phone alerting me that someone poked me. The rain begin to hit my window as I turn on my speaker […]

    by

  • Dehydration is the Enemy

    Dehydration is the enemy. This is my life motto, mostly because I haven’t yet had a meaningful enough life experience to warrant something as cliché as a proper life motto. Nevertheless, dehydration is a problem I face every day when I come to uni, and that is because there are not enough drinking fountains. Every […]

    by

  • Polarising Opinions

    There is something very easy about extremities: it’s the comfort that comes with treating “right” and “wrong” as if they are unquestionable, unshakable truths. It’s the relief of being able to point the finger at someone else, identify the problem, the enemy as “other” and, in doing so, absolve oneself of blame. It feels good […]

    by

  • Rants On Driving

    Let’s talk about anxiety and driving for a hot minute. Now I grew up driving in Hamilton, and the Hamil-hole provided some excellent space for crafting up my skills and doing wheelies. This being said, upon moving to Wellington, I missed the freedom of driving everywhere. Needless to say, I grew to love walking around […]

    by

  • “fuck off you have an opinion on everything”

    While I have gained a bit of a reputation for being opinionated, I do have an attention span best suited to 280 characters. Bearing in mind that I have never once in my life been wrong, these are the hills that I am willing to die on: Sweet things should not be served with dinner. […]

    by

  • Like A Banana: Peeling Back the Meaning of Crazy Rich Asians

    The trailer for Crazy Rich Asians dropped a few weeks ago, claiming a star-studded cast, including Constance Wu (Fresh Off the Boat), Harry Shum Jnr (Glee; Shadowhunters), and Awkwafina (Ocean’s 8). But more importantly, it’s a 100% Asian cast – the first of its kind in Hollywood in over 20 years. Maybe my standards are […]

    by

  • NOTE TO LOUISE // SALLY: THE TRACK CHANGES THAT I MAKE INDEPENDENTLY ON THIS I WOULD LIKE TO BE PUBLISHED IN THE MAGAZINE FOR VISUAL EFFECT.

    It’s 2am. A drunken sprawl of words and clothes on the right hand side of my bed. I lay on my bed, feeling like I gave myself excuses for incoherency. Another night with full intention but no method of actualising said desires. I knew all too well what I wanted to write about, how I […]

    by

  • Work for Free? Yeah Right

    You study, learn, do an internship perhaps – then you graduate. Want a paid gig? Nah man, but perhaps you can help me on a project and I’ll introduce you to a few guys… Fuck that! Exterior, Melling Station, mid-afternoon I run into the train with a puffy black jacket, which makes me look like […]

    by

  • The Myth of Science

    I’ve been thinking a lot about what science means to broader culture today. When I hear people say “I believe in science!” or wearing a “Science! It Works!” shirt, I always want to ask them: What do you mean when you say “science”? What do you think science does? What is your myth of science? […]

    by

  • Memes Are No Joke

    Why am I petrified at the outset of this article? Why do my hands tremble above the keys, knuckles sweating, joints weak? I think it’s because I am about to be… sincere. That is quite a scary thing to attempt to do in this day and age, to talk seriously about something that you care […]

    by

  • Fact of the Day

    CW: suicide, depression & sexual assault 28/05/2018 Dear Louise, It’s the Opinions issue next week! Awesome. I love hearing what people think. I told my friend this issue was coming up and she said “isn’t every issue of Salient an opinions issue?” — obviously you and I know the difference, but the wider student population […]

    by

  • What’s Your Opinion?

    Originally I wasn’t planning to write an opinion piece at all. It felt a bit greedy to write one when I get an editorial every week. But our designer Ruby said to me, “you’re the editor, you should. I’m doing one even though I can’t write for shit”. And here I am. Guys, I tried […]

    by

  • Arts and Science

  • Dragon Friends

    Join a barbarian/warlock half-orc, a home-schooled highly homicidal high-elf warlock, a sassy occasionally lycanthropic halfling rogue, and a handsome human man, as they traverse through the Forgotten Realms and other fantastical lands getting into all kinds of shenanigans.
    The Dragon Friends podcast is based in Sydney, and is one of the top comedy Dungeons and Dragons podcasts around. (Before you nerds with the D&D know-how ask if it’s better than Critical Role – no, it’s not.)
    Five (sometimes drunk) Australian comedians and voice actors, one fantastic game master (GM), and various interchangeable bards gather together at the Giant Dwarf Theatre in Sydney each month to bless a live audience and podcast listeners with side-splitting sessions of this immersive role-playing game. If somehow you know nothing about D&D and are still reading, here’s a quick run down: think of it like an RPG video game – you are a character who has a goal, and your character is surrounded by other characters and a whole universe for you to achieve your goal. D&D is the same, except it’s not just you playing. There’s typically 4-6 players all with characters of their own (a “party”). The GM is like the video game itself, omniscient and omnipotent in relation to you, the player. They are the information, the setting, the events. The entire game is in their head, and they describe it to you, so you and your friends can play and be the nerds that you know you are.

    Dave Harmon, GM of Dragon Friends, is amazing. He knows how to create a world for the players that is both inventive and challenging, without overloading information. The party themselves are inventive, hilarious, and brilliant improvisers, making every new episode of this pod something to look forward to, as literally anything could happen with these players who know no boundaries.

    The adventures on this podcast range from much-used D&D settings such as Waterdeep and Daggerford, to the classic adventure of Curse of Strahd (which happens to be my favourite season, if you’re gonna give this podcast a shot, start with season 2).
    The show is rife with Australian-ness. I personally enjoy it – the accent doesn’t grate on me as it does so many of my fellow native Kiwi podcast listeners – and the particular sense of humour that comes with an Aussie role playing game is just, so great, I can’t even describe it.
    What does grind my gears with this show is one particular NPC voice actor, Ben Jenkins, and his continual use of the big bad C word. Sure, I know that me not liking it is very much my problem, but it’s also my right, so ha. In one particular episode Dave apologised to the international listeners of the podcast in-show, as he realized that not everyone is accustomed to hearing the C word used in an endearing way.
    The voice actors who play Non-Player Characters (NPCs) are in my opinion, what makes Dragon Friends so unique. The players walk through a hallway in a gothic dungeon and the GM describes how spooky it is – suddenly they hear two nasally-voiced guards bickering over who’s meant to be on watch, and the atmosphere is destroyed as the ridiculousness of the situation kicks in. This podcast is so dumb, and I live for it.

    by

  • NZ Music Month

    Another NZ Music Month has come and gone, and as per usual has brought with it much in the way of quality Kiwi music. I’m using this space this week to highlight four homegrown albums which deserve your attention, as much of the best music to come out this year has come from good old Aotearoa.

    CARB ON CARB – FOR AGES

    For Ages is the sophomore release from emo duo Carb on Carb, following up their superb self-titled record from 2015. The duo’s Facebook “about” section sees them describing their sound as sitting “somewhere between the classic 90s emo of The Get Up Kids, and more current counterparts like Camp Cope”. Fans of the latter will find a lot to like about this group, particularly in singer Nicole’s vocal chops and sharp lyricism. For Ages sees Carb on Carb tackling family relationships (“Ma”), race and gender issues in New Zealand (“Man Says”), and positioning New Zealand’s place in the world (on the superbly named “Home Again 2”). The musical performances are every bit as sharp and considered as the lyrics, and in general this is just a sweet album that rewards investment. Give it a hoon!

    JULIA DEANS – WE LIGHT FIRE

    I had the pleasure of seeing Julia Deans at the back end of May, on the Marlon Williams show at the Hunter Lounge (see last week’s gig review for more on that). I had only heard bits and pieces of the album at that point in time, and had been drawn to single “Clandestine” particularly, for its simple and elegant nature. As is often the case, seeing songs from We Light Fire placed new meaning into the tracks here, and as such probably drove my enjoyment of the album. I remember a heckler at the gig asking her for “Lydia” (the Fur Patrol hit from which many first time listeners will recognise her), and Deans responding with “Chelsea”, the closer on We Light Fire, a song “with a different girl’s name”. One could argue this tune is even better, with its sensitive and personal vocal performance and down-to-earth lyrics serving as a mission statement for the album. Definitely one of my favourite albums so far this year, so check it out!

    WAX CHATTELS – WAX CHATTELS

    Wax Chattels’ self-titled debut is a gritty one. The band has, in a variety of interviews, described their sound as “guitarless guitar music”, and it carries a real swagger and a strong sense of identity. Wax Chattels is a visceral and fresh debut, with many highlights. I particularly enjoy “In My Mouth”, where the vocals carry a scathing confidence, while the breakdown in the back third of the song displays phenomenal musicianship and a firm post-punk edge. “Stay Disappointed” is another gem here, and features a relentless groove and a particularly sharp bass. Wax Chattels remind me a lot of groups like Preoccupations (and the offshoot groups that preceded them), and could even draw a comparison to grittier Flying Nun material from the golden era. These songs shine a light on some of the darker facets of New Zealand society, and I feel as if they occupy a unique lane in the New Zealand market. Can’t wait to see where this band goes next.

    KODY NIELSON – BIRTHDAY SUITE

    Birthday Suite is Kody Nielson’s follow up to the fantastic Personal Computer, released under the Silicon pseudonym (and positively reviewed by a wide-eyed, first-year, neck-bearded version of myself for this very magazine in 2015). Nielson’s latest is another in a series of left turns that his music has taken since the conclusion of The Mint Chicks, and is an entirely instrumental record. The track listing is super fun, as each of the tracks are named for a birthday of a friend or family member, even going as far as releasing the advance singles for Birthday Suite on the actual birthdays of the people in question. Nielson creates and covers a vast sonic landscape on Birthday Suite, and fans of krautrock, experimental electronic music, and Frank Zappa will find plenty to like here.

    by

  • Dear White People

    In celebration of our opinion issue, I am going to do a movie review of a movie that presents semi “controversial” opinions.
    Dear White People centres on the biracial character Sam, who is navigating life in college, and being an active voice speaking out on the nuances of systematic racism towards black people on her radio segment “Dear White People”. Naturally, there is an outrage among the white people, and even some black people too (you can’t please everyone).
    This film explores various intersections of the black identity, and different views that come with that. At the heart of the film is the idea of free speech, opinion, political ideologies, and discussion about how the black identity is shaped and used in America. It definitely has some words to say to Kanye about slavery being a choice.
    Dear White People gives a critical outlook and opinion of what African Americans have to deal with, even in a “modern” and “liberal” society. It puts a spotlight onto many relevant issues of not just race, but alienation in one’s identity, and the nuances of justice and morality. The film also has some cheeky Taylor Swift references in there. (I forever stan).
    From black appropriation to white fragility, Dear White People is sure to cause uncomfortable conversation in a white household, and damn isn’t that great. Divide some opinions and potentially hurt the egos of your white friends by watching the film or the TV series on Netflix now.

    by

  • You’re Allowed to Watch Shit Films

    Hey fam, you’re allowed to watch shit films. I know, as a film writer, I should be shilling for the newest film that any old white dude with a good reputation has got coming out. It’s only sensible. Lars Von Trier’s got a new film out! Let’s all watch that! He’s a genius, an incredible filmmaker, and we should totally ignore the shadiness in his past because he’s good at framing shots, or something. Fuck that.
    You’re allowed to watch films that make you happy. Doesn’t matter if they’re bad, doesn’t matter if they’re shot terribly, if you like them, watch them.
    I loved Ghostbusters (2016). I saw it five times in the theatre, and I was very close to seeing it for a sixth. I know my predecessor here at Salient would probably have a coronary upon reading those words — considering the scathing review he gave it at the time — but I loved it. What’s better than a badass friendship, awesome women, and a rad soundtrack? Nothing! Was it the best film of the year? No way in hell! Did it have plot holes? Yeah! But did I enjoy it? Absolutely.

    There’s nothing wrong with sitting back and watching something that you like. World War Z was raked over the coals by critics, but it’s one of my favourite films. Same with The Boat that Rocked.
    Sure, there’s beauty in efficacy, in perfectly framed shots, and in arté filmés, but there’s joy in watching things that feel comforting, movies that allow you to sink back and relax in the glorious warmth of familiarity. These movies don’t necessarily have to be good, though. We don’t need to constantly strive to find the best pieces of art and cast the things that make us feel happy to the wayside.
    Life’s too short to care about what film critics say, anyway.

    by

  • Flint Town: Season 1

    In the 8-part documentary series Flint Town, directors Jessica Dimmock, Zackary Canepari, and Drea Cooper devote 12 months of their time to being part of the police force of Flint, Michigan — a small American city still feeling the effects of a succession of unfortunate and brutal shocks to its community and body politic. First, the city’s largest employer General Motors closed its plants in Flint, meaning a major loss of jobs for the town’s workers. Following that was the city’s water crisis, a result of a change to the source of the city’s drinking water that ultimately exposed the city’s 100,000 residents to lead contaminants.

    Rocked by such events, with a lack of proper manpower and statistics, Flint became one of America’s poorest and most dangerous cities. Unlike the setting of a Hollywood movie, Flint Town takes viewers to a place they will never likely visit or see. The audience is treated to a depressed, dramatic landscape comprising of poverty, vulnerability, and desperation with no easy fixes. Flint Town plunges head first into the world of the disenfranchised and marginalised in a big way.
    The series, following events paralleling the 2016 election campaign, mainly focuses on the day-to-day experiences and trials of the Flint police department, an institution in a state of disrepair and instability with dwindling resources and staff members. Viewers are informed that the number of department officers has decreased from 300 to 98 over the last 10 years – the lowest number out of comparably sized US cities.
    The police, depending on the situation, alternate between embodying aggression, awkwardness, and understanding — a result of the clear stress and exhaustion brought about by the role they play in the community. Despite the series only lasting 8 episodes, it manages to create and develop a few personal story lines that go beyond simply seeing these characters as working officers.

    While the obvious focus of the series is that of the police force, the series isn’t about the police in an unfortunate city; it’s a series about that unfortunate city, expressed through one of the few groups able to experience and discover all parts of it. The series eventually begins to intertwine the community’s reactions and feelings towards the city’s police force to create an intriguing dialogue between the city residents and those who are expected to protect them, reminding the audience that conflicting viewpoints do indeed exist.
    What many will notice immediately about the series is its atmospheric cinematography and filmmaking, which serves to helpfully reminds the audience that more exists in Flint beyond crime and poverty.
    However, at times it can be more beautiful than it perhaps needs to be, aestheticizing crime scenes, splatters of blood, bullet casings, empty homes, the hands of a dead teenager in the snow. Furthermore, the at times inconsistent filmmaking can get in the way of the story it is trying to tell.
    The disagreement on profession-specific ideals between the officers of Flint serves to reduce the power of the idea of treating “the police” as a single entity.

    Flint Town ends up being a much more open and apt assessment of how race and class issues may affect community relations, and ultimately challenges the wisdom of short-term answers to long-term problems.

    by

  • Sometimes It’s Too Cold to Go Outside

    Here are some mostly online things to see this week, because these days are cold lately.

    Looking:
    William Linscott, Daydreaming and the Death of the Internet, at MEANWHILE (online)
    http://meanwhile.gallery/#platform-oligopoly
    William Linscott has produced a semi-interactive text for MEANWHILE’s online gallery, meditating on the state of the internet as a place that is democratic and innovative, and how these notions are increasingly fallible. This sort of criticism is essential in order to find ways to protest against the internet’s adulthood as another censored, hegemonic form of media. The url world is not immune from any of the conditions (capitalist, racist, state-monitored etc.) of the real world that created it.
    DIRT gallery (online artist-run initiative)
    https://dirt.gallery/pages/exhibitions
    They always told you at school that things on the internet are immortal. This is cool for an online gallery because it means their exhibitions catalogue is cumulative. DIRT gallery is an exclusively online space, which means that the artists they host have the freedom to be more experimental than a physical gallery space can necessarily allow. The two shows that have been online since this year are Maddy Plimmer’s Click Here, and Louisa Beatty’s Circular Breathing — two very different shows, which show the diversity that this platform can facilitate.

    Robbie Handcock, Love You to the Wrist and Back, at Playstation until 9 June
    This is the only exhibition on the list that you will have to venture into the real world to see. Robbie Hancock’s paintings exist in a similar world to David Hockney’s, combining homoerotic imagery with utopian colours. Dealing with queer subjectivity and aesthetics, Love You to the Wrist and Back is an intimate and sensual viewing experience, but also considers how these themes fit into wider social frameworks.
    Reading:
    Lucinda Bennett, To Care and Be Cared For, The Pantograph Punch
    http://pantograph-punch.com/post/to-be-cared-for
    The thing about creative practices is that it is often assumed that ideas and processes come easily, that they are some sort of lifeblood. Art is just like any other thing though; sometimes you feel burned out and it is hard. It is still work, and it is easier not to do it. In Lucinda Bennett’s essay, she describes why proper valuation and remuneration for the work that artists do is crucial to sustain the fields they are working in, especially when the precariousness associated with working in art affects marginalised groups the most.

    ENDLESS LOVE, Blueprint for an ARI, First Draft

    http://firstdraft.org.au/exhibitions/writers-program-blueprint-for-an-ari/

    Artist-run initiatives can be really good spaces for hosting the work of artists in a context that doesn’t get them to fit an institutionalised narrative. The collective ENDLESS LOVE, consisting of Hana Pera Aoake and Callum Devlin, have compiled this document of essential considerations for an artist-run initiative. There’s also a really extensive directory of past and present artist-run initiatives around Aotearoa.

    by

  • Some Spicy AF Hot Takes

    Instead of writing one long opinionated column for the books section, I decided to crowdsource some hella spicy literary hot takes, because it was what everyone wanted and asked for. All of these are real submissions from lots of different people from Facebook, Twitter, or me harassing them at the dinner table every night until they came up with a suggestion.
    Disclaimer: I do not talk any responsibility from any injury or illnesses that may arise as a result from reading this column.
    • “I’d rather be slowly crushed to death in the giant Hub doors than have to read (or watch) Game of Thrones.”
    • “Jodi Picoult should win the 2019 Man Booker Prize.”
    • “Haruki Murakami writes better essays than novels, because then he is actually capable of not writing the same theme over and over again.”
    • “If you’ve read Jordan B. Peterson’s 12 Rules for Life, you need to call your mother and apologise.”
    • “A predictable plot is one of the easiest things to complain about in a novel, but I love them. There’s something rather comforting about starting a book and knowing that by the end the mystery will be solved and the couple will be in love and the world will be saved. It’s the sort of resolution that fiction is for.”
    • “I got a free copy of Rupi Kaur’s The Sun and Her Flowers and started to read it, but when I realised that I’m not 16 years old and I’m not on Tumblr anymore, I stopped, re-evaluated my entire life, then recycled it.”

    • “Anyone who was a devout Harry Potter fan when they were young is a self important ass with a bad sense of humour now.”
    • “Honestly don’t know why fanfiction has such a bad rap. Yeah, it can be weird and gross, but it was what got me into reading as a kid and I have to thank it for that. And just to add: My Immortal is still the greatest piece of literature ever created.”

    • “As a fan of dystopian novels, Ben Elton’s Blind Faith is extremely disturbing and gives my much-loved genre a bad name. The relationships are shallow at best and the paranoid anxiety with its theme of personal surveillance oozes with predictability.”
    • “Every dude I’ve met who said their favourite books were Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series turned out to be a creep. They might be great books, but this is too much of a coincidence to ignore.”
    • “Has anyone actually ever finished The Luminaries?”
    • “I don’t have anything to add because I only read good books.”
    • “I could eat a can of alphabet soup and shit onto some paper and still write a better novel than most young adult writers.”
    • “I bought Infinite Jest over a year ago and it has sat on my bookshelf ever since (and moved house with me twice). It’s an absolute tome and probably one of the most stereotypical books to have on a mid-late 20 year old male’s bookshelf. The recent allegations against David Foster Wallace also make me question the validity of the book and its author, but I’ll get round to finally reading it, controversy or not.”
    • And finally, a combined list of authors that people said are overrated or boring: Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Emily Bronte, Katherine Mansfield, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Virginia Woolf, J. K. Rowling, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, and Albert Camus.
    If any of those hot and spicy takes offended you, please shout all comments, queries, and complaints into the void.

    by

  • About the Author ()

    Salient is a magazine. Salient is a website. Salient is an institution founded in 1938 to cater to the whim and fancy of students of Victoria University. We are partly funded by VUWSA and partly by gold bullion that was discovered under a pile of old Salients from the 40's. Salient welcomes your participation in debate on all the issues that we present to you, and if you're a student of Victoria University then you're more than welcome to drop in and have tea and scones with the contributors of this little rag in our little hideaway that overlooks Wellington.

    Add Comment

    You must be logged in to post a comment.

    Recent posts

    1. Second test
    2. test test
    3. Recipes from the Suffrage Cookbook
    4. Beneath Skin and Bone
    5. No Common Ground
    6. Chris Dave and the Drumhedz
    7. Good Girls
    8. Winter Warmers: Home Alone
    9. Winter Warmers: About Time
    10. Sex at Dawn
    Website-Cover-Photo7

    Editor's Pick

    This Ain’t a Scene it’s a Goddamned Arm Wrestle

    : Interior – Industrial Soviet Beerhall – Night It was late November and cold as hell when I stumbled into the Zhiguli Beer Hall. I was in Moscow, about to take the trans-Mongolian rail line to Beijing, and after finding someone in my hostel who could speak English, had decided