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July 16, 2018 | by  | in News |
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Editors Part Way With Craccum

The co-editors of Craccum, Auckland University’s student magazine, have resigned from their positions in early July, citing personal reasons for the resignation.
The positions of Craccum editor are appointed via student body election and editors are non voting members of the Auckland University Students’ Association (AUSA). As part of their contracts, Craccum editors are not allowed to criticize their student association, unlike the other student magazines around New Zealand, who have editorial independence. The editors were underpaid for the hours they worked.

AUSA president Anna Cusack said that an interim editor will be appointed in the meantime, and the next edition of Craccum will go out as usual. “Many applications” have been received for the interim position.
Cusack said that they are “aware that choosing the Craccum editors through an annual election is a unique system and the Board is reviewing the process”.
Anis Azizi, the International Students’ Officer, has also resigned, which makes five resignations out of the 18 student association members so far this year.

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