Viewport width =

AuthorKahu Kutia

Author Archive: Kahu Kutia

rss feed

April 10, 2017

Chevron Te Whetumatarau Hassett, Mum with wakahuia   When I was studying art in high school, it was very rare that I could find a Māori artist to inspire my research — rarer still to find a Māori photographer. Historically we have always been in front of the lens, categorised, fetishised by classical anthropologists, consistently […]

March 20, 2017

As Māori at university, it is often the case that we are motivated to succeed by the mahi that we know needs to be done — to help our whānau, to help our home towns, to help our iwi, and, more widely, to help te iwi Māori in general. However, this journey we strive for […]

March 3, 2017

Tēnā tātou! So we have all come out the other side of O-Week (mostly) unscathed. Hopefully by now the empty Scrumpy bottles and 3-day-old KC’s takeaway containers on your floor are accompanied by textbooks and your first lot of readings for the year. It’s the second column of the year, and I am already struggling […]

September 25, 2016

I’ll be honest here and say that one of life’s greatest satisfactions is undoubtedly the moment I get to cross something off a to-do list. Dorky, I know, but there just really isn’t anything that can match the moment you conquer some small mountain and remove some niggling task from your mind. Unfortunately its not […]

July 31, 2016

I’m sure many of you saw the recent Vice article that said that New Zealand is the most ignorant country in the world. Our own perceptions are dramatically different to the actual reality of life in New Zealand. We believe we have achieved justice, that we have ascended to a rank of superiority over other […]

July 24, 2016

At this stage of early adulthood, we all want to figure out who we are and what we truly care about doing. No matter how far I search, there’s something I always keep coming back to. It is the way in which I experience the world through my body—the body of a young Māori woman. […]

August 16, 2015

My upbringing immersed in my māoritanga has, nevertheless, been incredibly influential on who I am as a feminist