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July 29, 2013 | by  | in Arts Film |
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Ten Movies to Watch When Hungover

1. The Big Lebowski (dir. Joel and Ethan Coen, 1998)

Sharp, fast-paced, twisted, with utterly magnificent performances. The Big Lebowski is a barrel of laughs.

2. Gosford Park (dir. Robert Altman, 2001)

A slice of upstairs–downstairs drama, deceit and betrayal. Altman is known for his ensemble casts and true-to-life yet stylised outlook, and Gosford Park certainly delivers. Similar to Downton Abbey but about a thousand times better.

3. Tiny Furniture (dir. Lena Dunham, 2010)

If you liked Girls, you’ll probably like this a whole lot more. Tiny Furniture follows Aura (played by Dunham) after returning home from her liberal arts college to her mother’s ultra-stylish New-York loft and her following emotional/existential/postgraduate crisis/journey. Watch while eating peanut-butter chocolate in bed.

4. 2 Days In Paris (dir. Julie Delpy, 2007)

Hilarious, charming, AND French. Perfect for uplifting your wallowing-alone-in-self-pity-on-a- Sunday-afternoon mood.

5. Any documentary on a pop singer’s rise to fame/fall from grace.

6. Rushmore (dir. Wes Anderson, 1998)

Jason Schwartzman. Bill Murray. Wes Anderson(!) An endearing coming-of-age journey, it’s bloody genius.

7. The Wizard of Oz (dir. Victor Fleming, King Vidor, George Cukor, Norman Taurog and Mervyn LeRoy, 1939)

An absolute classic. Revisit the innocent days of your idyllic childhood and escape from the headache and shame for 100-or-so minutes.

8. The Godfather Trilogy (dir. Francis Ford Coppola, 1972, 1974 and 1990)

Spend your next hungover day engrossed in the rise and fall of the Corleones (and finally get all those pop-culture references!) Beware of Sofia Coppola’s awful performance in the third one— her talents definitely lie elsewhere.

9. Groundhog Day (dir. Harold Ramis, 1993)

Light-hearted entertainment with a spoonful of Bill Murray.

10. Local Hero (dir. Bill Forsyth, 1983)

Local Hero tells the story of Mac, a big-shot American oil-company representative sent to a small Scottish fishing village to purchase the town for the company. Poignant and subtly hilarious, an understated work of brilliance. Sure to uplift the dreariest of Saturdays in bed.

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The shade of Pasifika Brown is Bold and Brilliant. So is being a Woman and Fa’afafine

: Proud. Because I am a woman. I am a fa’afafine. I am unapologetic for that. Brown. Because my skin carries the stories of thousands of brown women who came before me. Pasifika. Because I know this is my culture. This is tradition. I know that there has been, and will always be,

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