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April 3, 2016 | by  | in News |
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UC wins engineering prize again, shock

Four University of Canterbury (UC) mechanical engineering students have been awarded the Ray Meyer Medal for excellence in student design by the Institute of Professional Engineers New Zealand.

2016 marks the tenth (yes, tenth) time in the last 12 years Canterbury has taken out the medal.

The award asks students to solve real life problems. International technology company Trimble, together with Fulton Hogan, proposed a need for avoiding dangerous encounters between road milling machines and underground utility structures.

Engineering students across New Zealand, including those from Victoria University, were quick to respond.

With a budget of $1800, the UC team created a unique prototype that relied on the use of low frequency radio wave (VLF) technology. Attached to a Fulton Hogan milling machine, it was successfully able to detect metal up to 0.25m deep.

The team was made up of Mo Chalabi, Thomas Coughlan, Josh Heenan, and Abel Leenders.

Their success was achieved with the help of senior lecturer of Mechanical Engineering Dr Geoffrey Rodgers who said of the win, “we are all excited about the win, it is a great recognition of the work the students did and a great reflection on UC.”

 

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