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July 8, 2019 | by  | in News |
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Are You There, Youths? It’s Me, Local Body Elections

If you’re reading the Salient news section, it’s a pretty good bet you’re a neeerd. If, by chance, you’re not a neeerd, then my apologies that you’ve been guilted into reading it by your neeerd friends. If you’re the former, I’m about to tell you something that is sure to get you hot and bothered (not a climate change joke). If you’re the latter, you’re not being excluded—this is just as important to non-neeerds as neeerds.

 

What I have to tell you is this:

 

Local body elections are coming up, and I want YOU to get educated, involved, and voting. 

 

Congrats if you figured out what the announcement was—you’ll do well in the crossword.

 

With local body elections on their merry way this year (voting’s in…), Salient News is bringing you one (1) whole page of content. EVERY. WEEK. on everything you need to know about it: Who’s running? What are the issues? What’s a council? How did I get here? Why is he talking like this? All of these questions answered and more. 

 

For the first half of this trimester, this page will be bringing you action-filled, jam-packed, hyphen-using profiles of five extra cool “youths” running for councils in the Wellington area. If you’re a neeerd, or know one, you probably already know who they are:

  • Victoria Rhodes-Carlin, for Greater Wellington Regional Council
  • Teri O’Neill, for Wellington City Council’s Eastern Ward
  • Josh Trlin, for Porirua City Council’s Northern Ward
  • Rabeea Inayatullah, for Porirua City Council’s Northern Ward
  • Tamatha Paul, for Wellington City Council’s Lampton Ward

 

We spent a tonne of time and energy booking rooms to film our interviews with them, so the least you can do is read them.

 

But why stop with the magazine? Wouldn’t it be amazing—nay, miraculous—if we not only had content in the magazine, but on SalientFM and Salient TV as well?! 

 

Luckily for you, that’s EXACTLY what we’re doing. If you want to hear the candidates talking, tune in to the Young Matt Show on the radio waves (expertly produced by the young Matt Casey). If you want to see the candidates talking, keep your eyes peeled for content-promos for each candidate made by Salient TV (expertly produced by the significantly older Monique Thorp).

 

Full interviews, with the-same-age-as-me-but-much-more-successful Peter McKenzie interviewing, will be uploaded online when I figure out how to do that.

 

Governments are important (Young ACT do not interact). The national government is important because it makes decisions for where you live, nationally. Local government is important because it makes decisions for where you also live. 

 

Do you want proper public transport? Do you want houses that won’t give you a lung infection? Do you want people to take your mental health seriously? Do you want to not live in a post-climate-change hellscape? 

 

Then, I cannot stress this enough: Get educated, get involved, get voting. 

 

Read Salient and get. gud.

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