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Issue , 2019

Issue 17 – Wan Solwara

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News

  • Whatungarongaro te tangata, toitū te whenua!

  • Brown Body Elections

  • Mauna Kea

  • That’s Us Then Exhibition

  • Akamai

  • Features

  • Grandma’s Panipopos

    My grandma had hands that could knead love into Panipopos Sew consideration into pe’as for white sunday And slap sense into the back of my head because I’d giggle at how she said “Luisa aua ke fiaboko” I could see her pride in the way she’d curl ribbons on the ula loles, waddle up to […]

    by

  • Advice from my dad:

    “It’s not always what you say, it’s how you say it”   When you ask me if I’m algood, the tone in which it is asked will dictate my response.    I watch to see if the curves of your mouth betray a sly smile, or if your eyes stay hardened as they look back […]

    by

  • Without the Ocean, what are we?

    School Strike 4 Climate 15/03/2019   Papatūānuku and Tangaroa transcend time, lives & worlds. They interlock and intertwine as one – with deep rooted whakapapa to all worlds. As protectors of the earth & seas, our guardianship has failed. The human race have polluted & destroyed this earth and its oceans. Now, climate change is […]

    by

  • Uncomfortable places: skin.

      Where are you from?  My list was always ready: England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, puppy dogs’ tails, a little Spanish, maybe German, and—almost as an afterthought—half Samoan. An unwanted fraction.   But you don’t seem like a Samoan. I thought you were [insert other ethnicity]. A smile. A sense of accomplishment. A watered seed of […]

    by

  • In The Manner

      I had a chat to PhD student Ashleigh Feu’u about her gender identity and navigating life and academia as a fa’afafine.    How do you define your gender identity?   First and foremost, these are my personal views and not a generalisation of all fa’afafine views. There are many ways individual fa’afafine identify themselves, […]

    by

  • Hula Le’a Wale

      ‘Everything ancient was once new and though our structures were denied age no amount of dismantling, disassembling, desecrating or disrespecting of our right to be can deny us our ancientness, our ability to stand with thousands and thousands.’ – Emalani Case   Like myself, Dr Emalani Case started learning hula from a very young […]

    by

  • The house that John brought

    Have you ever posted on IG in admiration of your parents or grandparents, who sacrificed so much to immigrate to New Zealand for you… but also mocked someone for speaking broken English in a foreign accent? Have you ever thanked the Lord for the food on your plate, but not Tagaloa for perfecting the tides […]

    by

  • Papua Merdeka – Free West Papua

    CW: Violence, Genocide, Rape   What’s happening in West Papua?   West Papua, with the independent nation of Papua New Guinea in the east, constitute the island of Papua in Melanesia. It is situated approximately 200 km north of Australia, covered in rainforest, and is a biodiverse and minerally rich land. There are over 250 […]

    by

  • The Nuclear Pacific

      Who lives in a pineapple under the sea? (Spongebob Squarepants) What lives in a concrete dome on Runit Island with the potential to leak into the Pacific Ocean? (Nuclear waste)   The Pacific Islands have a dark history of nuclear exploitation. After World War II, the nuclear arms race was afoot. Major military powers […]

    by

  • Through Blood, By Blood

        If you’re standing before a crowd, speaking to hundreds of school students striking for better climate action outside Parliament steps, it’s probably not a good idea to look around.    I felt adrift in a sea of signs and hundreds of students chanting. Then I saw it. One sign in the crowd that […]

    by

  • Reclaiming Style

    Fashion is a form of expression. How you dress is a projection of your personality, what you believe in, what you like—and, for most, dependent on ease of comfort. Fashion is also community. Fashion is conscious consuming. Fashion is supporting your mate’s start-up jewellery biz. Fashion is wearing Pacific jewellery, a sei in one ear, […]

    by

  • Ferry

    CW: Mental Illness, Suicide, Substance Use   1. I’m thinking about my first solo swim at Mawhitipana Bay when I was five. A huge adventure for little limbs, quite quickly I was pulled into deeper waters, but despite the salt in my stomach there were so many days after school I would wade through the […]

    by

  • SAFE – The fragility of male masculinity.

    CW: Speaking out   It’s okay to be sad. It’s okay to be angry. It’s okay to cry.    Recently, we have seen a push in awareness for mental health—specifically, male mental health. The stigma of male strength has been an obstruction. A hinderance. Trying to get males to be honest with their feelings and […]

    by

  • Te Namo Te Lumanaki

    Malo ni, ulutonu mai, and welcome! We are privileged and honored to have the opportunity to share our Tokelau cultural heritage with the wider community. It is our aim to create a sustainable pathway for future generations of Tokelau students to come. Newly established in August 2014, Te Namo is the only Tokelauan Students association […]

    by

  • Grandma’s Panipopos

    My grandma had hands that could knead love into Panipopos Sew consideration into pe’as for white sunday And slap sense into the back of my head because I’d giggle at how she said “Luisa aua ke fiaboko” I could see her pride in the way she’d curl ribbons on the ula loles, waddle up to […]

    by

  • Advice from my dad:

    “It’s not always what you say, it’s how you say it”   When you ask me if I’m algood, the tone in which it is asked will dictate my response.    I watch to see if the curves of your mouth betray a sly smile, or if your eyes stay hardened as they look back […]

    by

  • Without the Ocean, what are we?

    School Strike 4 Climate 15/03/2019   Papatūānuku and Tangaroa transcend time, lives & worlds. They interlock and intertwine as one – with deep rooted whakapapa to all worlds. As protectors of the earth & seas, our guardianship has failed. The human race have polluted & destroyed this earth and its oceans. Now, climate change is […]

    by

  • Uncomfortable places: skin.

      Where are you from?  My list was always ready: England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, puppy dogs’ tails, a little Spanish, maybe German, and—almost as an afterthought—half Samoan. An unwanted fraction.   But you don’t seem like a Samoan. I thought you were [insert other ethnicity]. A smile. A sense of accomplishment. A watered seed of […]

    by

  • In The Manner

      I had a chat to PhD student Ashleigh Feu’u about her gender identity and navigating life and academia as a fa’afafine.    How do you define your gender identity?   First and foremost, these are my personal views and not a generalisation of all fa’afafine views. There are many ways individual fa’afafine identify themselves, […]

    by

  • Hula Le’a Wale

      ‘Everything ancient was once new and though our structures were denied age no amount of dismantling, disassembling, desecrating or disrespecting of our right to be can deny us our ancientness, our ability to stand with thousands and thousands.’ – Emalani Case   Like myself, Dr Emalani Case started learning hula from a very young […]

    by

  • The house that John brought

    Have you ever posted on IG in admiration of your parents or grandparents, who sacrificed so much to immigrate to New Zealand for you… but also mocked someone for speaking broken English in a foreign accent? Have you ever thanked the Lord for the food on your plate, but not Tagaloa for perfecting the tides […]

    by

  • Papua Merdeka – Free West Papua

    CW: Violence, Genocide, Rape   What’s happening in West Papua?   West Papua, with the independent nation of Papua New Guinea in the east, constitute the island of Papua in Melanesia. It is situated approximately 200 km north of Australia, covered in rainforest, and is a biodiverse and minerally rich land. There are over 250 […]

    by

  • The Nuclear Pacific

      Who lives in a pineapple under the sea? (Spongebob Squarepants) What lives in a concrete dome on Runit Island with the potential to leak into the Pacific Ocean? (Nuclear waste)   The Pacific Islands have a dark history of nuclear exploitation. After World War II, the nuclear arms race was afoot. Major military powers […]

    by

  • Through Blood, By Blood

        If you’re standing before a crowd, speaking to hundreds of school students striking for better climate action outside Parliament steps, it’s probably not a good idea to look around.    I felt adrift in a sea of signs and hundreds of students chanting. Then I saw it. One sign in the crowd that […]

    by

  • Reclaiming Style

    Fashion is a form of expression. How you dress is a projection of your personality, what you believe in, what you like—and, for most, dependent on ease of comfort. Fashion is also community. Fashion is conscious consuming. Fashion is supporting your mate’s start-up jewellery biz. Fashion is wearing Pacific jewellery, a sei in one ear, […]

    by

  • Ferry

    CW: Mental Illness, Suicide, Substance Use   1. I’m thinking about my first solo swim at Mawhitipana Bay when I was five. A huge adventure for little limbs, quite quickly I was pulled into deeper waters, but despite the salt in my stomach there were so many days after school I would wade through the […]

    by

  • SAFE – The fragility of male masculinity.

    CW: Speaking out   It’s okay to be sad. It’s okay to be angry. It’s okay to cry.    Recently, we have seen a push in awareness for mental health—specifically, male mental health. The stigma of male strength has been an obstruction. A hinderance. Trying to get males to be honest with their feelings and […]

    by

  • Te Namo Te Lumanaki

    Malo ni, ulutonu mai, and welcome! We are privileged and honored to have the opportunity to share our Tokelau cultural heritage with the wider community. It is our aim to create a sustainable pathway for future generations of Tokelau students to come. Newly established in August 2014, Te Namo is the only Tokelauan Students association […]

    by

  • Arts and Science

  • Grandma’s Panipopos

    My grandma had hands that could knead love into Panipopos

    Sew consideration into pe’as for white sunday

    And slap sense into the back of my head because I’d giggle at how she said

    “Luisa aua ke fiaboko”

    I could see her pride in the way she’d curl ribbons on the ula loles, waddle up to the stage, arthritis and all to say

    “Luisa I love you.”

    She’d send out eye smiles to the drivers who flipped her off

    My nan was a queen who admittedly did not deserve a licence and she knew as she would say

    “Oi, sorry”

    My grandma spoke to me in onomatopoeias and I found a home in between the a’es and aikaes

    My nan was a queen who admittedly threw curses to my being when the remote control was too far away

    Fale left her kindness at the base of her shoulder I would lay my head on when life hit too hard and after the tears stopped she told me

    “Luisa ua la”

    Which meant.

    Take ur tears and dry them because

    You are a warrior

    These hands you have that are like mine can build life and nourish it. These feet you got from me have walked a path that has been washed away by the shores of men. But we stamp our footprint on the heart of our daughters to remind them, of a love we give to ourselves before we give to others. 

    That’s not really what she said

    But interpretations are all I have from my fob nan.

    Interpretations keep me awake at night replaying regrets in my head.

    I used to soak up everything she did like a sponge watch and learn and when I thought I could think for myself I wrung out the knowledge you gave me to wipe up the tears from mistakes I made. Like a child, I wrestled with the love you gave me and now even though I wrestle with time. Now,

    I try to knead the same love into my panipopos but they keep burning for some reason

    Sew consideration into peas for church but the needles prick my skin

    Throw eye smiles to those who wrong me but can’t restrain the sharp words that flow so easily

    And these pillows don’t hold the same warmth as ur shoulder

    Even the voice in my head doesn’t hold the same afflictions you did

    I wonder how long it will take to 

     

    heal.

     

    by

  • When They See Us

    When They See Us will leave you provoked, furious, and hopefully socially aware. Created, co-written and directed by the brilliant Ava DuVernay (Selma), she re-enters the foray of telling stories of racial politics, namely that of African American, through the incidents surrounding the infamous Central Park Five. The Netflix miniseries is a harrowing retelling of the five teens who were falsely accused and convicted of rape and murder in New York City’s Central Park in April 1989. The series follows the fateful night in April when the then teens were “in the wrong place at the wrong time”. DuVernay builds on her storytelling from Selma and brings forward the true essence of the Central Park Five. When They See Us puts the spotlight back on the racial, social, and economic issues affecting people of colour. Although a story from 1989, its themes continue to plague African Americans and Hispanics, notwithstanding the current climate of the Trump presidency. In a style that only DuVernay could master, she puts into frame the corruption and wickedness of those people that should rightly be vilified. In her realistic direction, you can see what DuVernay is seeking to tell the audience—the truth.

    There is a litter of powerful performances from both the teen and adult actors of the Central Park Five. Standouts include Jharrel Jerome (Moonlight) and supporting players Vera Farmiga (The Conjuring) and an ironic performance from Felicity Huffman (Transamerica).  Ava DuVernay does not hold back in her storytelling with a tense first two episodes, a claustrophobic episode three, right through to its emotional peak in the finale. The cinematography shines particularly in the court scenes as well scenes in the prison cells when the teens have aged to adults. The dark blue filter that the series is shot through adds a gloomy dimension in its storytelling of this bleak tale. The last episode, although a decent closing, is the longest and has some pacing issues, however it ends the miniseries not on a Hollywood’s cliché of “good overcomes evil” but rather a rethinking that “the truth will always come out”. 

    One cannot help but to draw parallels between this series and to those Pasifika stories that continue to sour the taste of racial relationships in society. It is hard to not think about the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy and its annexation to America; Samoa’s Mau movement, specifically Black Saturday; Fiji’s history of blackbirding and slavery; and, how can we forget—New Zealand’s own Dawn Raids. On a molecular level there are examples we see day-to-day that, although not on the level of the Central Park Five, are still tangible enough to awaken a rage and sadness. 

    As a Pasifika person, when I paid close attention to the language used on the five teens during the interrogation scenes, I thought to myself—that could be said to one of us. I am not sure what that says about NZ society, our justice system, and my perception of Pasifika peoples in the first two. It goes without saying that on some level, Pasifika people will be privy to such dehumanising, coercive and disrespectful language, as we have had it directed to us. The series questions if you are content with those ideas. It makes you take an inward look as to how you view the world and how you fit in it. Is it equitable? Is it fair? Is there justice? What should justice look like? DuVernay does amazingly in rendering the stories of the five teens and making sure that in some way it will relate to you, especially if you’re a person of colour.

    When They See Us is a masterpiece helmed by Ava DuVernay’s honest and raw directing. She is the true headliner of the series. It is a tough watch and at times disturbing. “It’s no longer about justice,” as the show says. “It’s about politics. And politics is about survival. And there’s nothing fair about survival”. 

    Currently showing on Netflix.

     

    by

  • Music & The Pacific

    For many of us Pacific people growing up, homegrown music meant “They Don’t Know” by Aaradhna and Savage on blast in the people mover; you and your cousins screaming—“Huh? Yo! That can’t be true! Now you wouldn’t be lyin to my face, now, would you?” 

    It was that tune from Once Were Warriors: “What’s the Time Mr Wolf?” amongst Ardijah and Herbs at frequent garage drink-ups with your horc uncle and his wife who wore too much bling. 

    It was Nesian Mystik, singing about Taro, Manioke and Lu Sipi while you sat at the beach or park with your family—with only breakfast crackers and WAHOO tuna waiting for you at home. 

     

    As with anything, our taste in music has matures with us. It grows with our experiences, and as artists themselves grow. With a particular focus on our hip hop scene (being predominantly Pasifika) forged by individuals such as internationally recognised David Dallas, Savage, Scribe, and P-Money, alongside collectives like Smashproof—there is no doubt that the current state of New Zealand music is healthy. Although each artist is different, together they hold a united front, demonstrating a unique type of sportsmanship you would find in a champion team. Often found collaborating on each other’s tracks—the likes of Melodownz (Avontale local), Church & AP (NZ’s hottest duo), Diggy Dupé (king of Central Auckland), Lukan Raisey (South Auckland local) and SWIDT (hip hop collective from Onehunga) are just a handful of many paying homage to their upbringing and recording their surroundings, detailing what they see via politically and socially conscious lyrics. Authentic in their storytelling, these artists bring the stories of Pacific people in New Zealand to the forefront of Aotearoa’s identity. Today, our hip hop culture is armed with honest examples of racism, reflective of issues surrounding male masculinity and mental health, the conflict involved in choosing one’s truth versus appeasing the expectations of family and demanding space and recognition. NZ hip hop artists fight stereotypes and systematic division enforced upon Pacific people in general and within the music industry itself. Transparent in their art, on the gram, and in real life, staying true is central to effectively making an impact while accomplishing their goals. 

     

    by

  • From the Hutt to the World

    Mean Fit: From the Hutt to the World

     

    Our Pacific fashion community both here in New Zealand and around the world is thriving. Utilising Pacific ingenuity, the work of both designers and creatives alike are reflective of their Pacific roots through ethical processes, indigenous representation, and an overall sustainable and inclusive ethos. The power of social media and a need for Pacific presence has supported the growth of many fashion industry creatives, from stylist and director Sammy Salsa (@sammysalsastyle) to the Queer Indigenous collective FAFSWAG, an interdisciplinary arts company championing social issues through cultural activism. (@fafswag)

     

    Overseas

     

    Emilia Wickstead, of Samoan descent, is a New Zealand designer who featured “ordinary yet extraordinary New Zealand women” in the May issue of British Vogue. Displaying her latest collection in collaboration with the Woolmark Company, Wickstead seized the opportunity to have the spotlight on women from home who emulate courage and ambition while making their mark on the world. The designer celebrated faces not normally found within the pages of a fashion magazine, many of Pacific descent.

     

    Closer to Home

     

    Papa Clothing, designed by Keva Rands, is recognised as one of New Zealand’s local talents—specialising in natural fabrics and made-to-order pieces created in her Auckland studio. With connections to Fiji, Hawaii, Samoa and Tongareva, Rands carries with her a unique lineage, and named Papa after her own namesake. Available via ^papaclothing.co.nz

     

    Lumai, also based in Auckland, is a label fronted by Papua New Guinean-born Dru Douglas. Capturing modern cuts and templates, the designer also takes on an interdisciplinary mission. Inspired by Papua New Guinea identity and its history of globalisation, Douglas also supports women’s artisanal collectives across the Pacific.

     

    More to Explore

     

    @layplan

    Wellington-based duo Lavinia and Talia, custom-made statement pieces, iconic for their bright colours, gathered frills, and faith-driven success.

    @moanacurrents

    Coming September 2019, a NZ Fashion Museum exhibition curated by Doris de Pont and Dan Ahwa, exploring modern Aotearoa Style with a Māori/Pacific inflection.

    @huntinggroundstore

    A New Zealand-owned and operated company, collection of new and pre-owned casual/luxury/one-off pieces.

     

    The Hutt: Delivering Streetwear, Everywhere

    Justine Taito


    The number of streetwear and thrifted clothing business pages on Instagram has increased dramatically; you have surely stumbled across one. Lately, there has been a rise in local Polynesian individuals and groups creating their own quality streetwear brands and thrifted companies, specialising in branded and designer gears to cop at a fair price. Ideal for sole and sugas on the student budget but still wanting to look luxurious. 

    Being a proud individual from the good old Hutt Valley, I want to acknowledge a couple of these brown businesses from the best region in Wellington (*insert eyes emoji*) doing the absolute most to get that bread.

    Today, streetwear is evolving by rewinding time, with the influence of the 90’s and early 2000s hip-hop having a significant impact on style. The return of graphic tees, cool-looking sweatpants, bright-coloured outerwear, and fly vintage-looking sneakers; Gender-neutral streetwear has so far proven progression. 

    Two local creators on the rise are Young Thrifted & Broke and I.N.A APPAREL.

    @YTANDB

    Young Thrifted & Broke, as it says in the name, delivers highly affordable gears for young and broke individuals (like us @ Vic, yay). The small Hutt Valley-based business is noticeably growing day by day on Instagram and has also created successful pop-up sale stores for locals in recent times. With the progress of fast fashion and landfills having un-loved clothing as the quickest growing form of waste, @YTANDB focuses on sustainable fashion, the importance of recycling, and saving quality streetwear grails.

    @I.N.A_APPAREL

    This emerging brand explores the need for diversity for men’s clothing, with its “Unfiltered Man” collection. In which believing that men’s fashion, lack the variety of clothing as compared to women’s wear; challenging the traditional idea of masculinity with its epic pastel palette of garments. This collection and other work by Ina Malama, the brain behind the brand, are set to be showcased for Fashion Week 2020 in all four fashion capitals of the world: New York, London, Paris, and Milan. 

     

    by

  • Advice from my dad:

    “It’s not always what you say, it’s how you say it”

     

    When you ask me if I’m algood, the tone in which it is asked will dictate my response. 

     

    I watch to see if the curves of your mouth betray a sly smile, or if your eyes stay hardened as they look back into mine. I watch as you clench your fist, the whites of your knuckles starting to show. I listen as your breathing quickens, awaiting whatever rebuttal I have. I feel as the air around me tenses and slows, as if the world is bearing witness to what is about to occur.

     

    Then I smile.

    “I’m algood, you?”

     

    My eyes light and warm, my mouth fixed in a coy grin. My hands down my side and open, awaiting an embrace. My breathing deep and measured, to keep me calm. The air drifting through, cooling hotter heads and whispering encouraging words. 

     

    Then you smile. 

    “Yeah safe toko”

     

    One phrase said in two ways. Two situations, with the negative one successfully negated. 

    It’s not always what you say; it’s how you say it. Thanks dad. 

     

    As my hands trace your face, I wonder if it lines with where your tears ran. As my hands part your hair, I wonder if you felt the same skin. As I kiss your cheek, I wonder if you’ll feel it wherever you are. 

     

    Anger and hatred belies the tears that flow when I’m alone. 

    Without you in this house, it no longer feels like my home. 

    Throwing hands with anyone who dares to throw around your name

    Stepping out people who don’t realise what I’m going through, as opposed to stepping up for the people who feel it the same.

    Heart breaking as our family dynamic tears at the seams.

    Smiling faces sing your praises not knowing how much that really means. 

    I don’t want to go school no more, because you’re not there to pick me up after. 

    I don’t want to tell jokes and goof around, because I know that I won’t hear your laughter. 

    I don’t let no one put hands on me because I know their hits won’t be as sore. 

    I fight with mum and my siblings because I’m hoping you come back to tell me no more. 

    I forget who I am, lost in my own head, with no one there to remind. 

    I destroy myself, an empty crab shell of the son you left behind. 

    Too sad to stay, too scared to leave, no longer willing to fight. 

    But keep the faith, envision your face, telling me, “Nah you’ll be alright.”

    And I am. I really am. 

    I survived the storm and am finally starting to come right. 

    Nightmares are far and few in between, I can enjoy my dreams and finally make it through the night. 

    I’ve grown comfortable with who I am, in my skin, happier than can be.  

    I have a kid now, and when I look at her I wonder, is this how you used to look at me?

    I’m working on dreams and in the kitchen I can cook what you used to, though not as good. 

    I’m at school again, getting educated, but still from Newtown repping the hood. 

    I’ve learnt not to talk as much, use my writing to deal with the thoughts in my head. 

    I’ve learnt to be more honest, that way I don’t have to remember what I’ve said. 

    I still struggle with my anger and have a wandering eye. 

    And I haven’t quite managed to tell the drugs and drink goodbye. 

    But I’m trying. Putting my faith in God to lead me, with me as his cattle. 

    Like you told me, as long as I’m trying, then I’ve already won half the battle. 

     

    by

  • Without the Ocean, what are we?



    School Strike 4 Climate 15/03/2019

     

    Papatūānuku and Tangaroa transcend time, lives & worlds. They interlock and intertwine as one – with deep rooted whakapapa to all worlds. As protectors of the earth & seas, our guardianship has failed. The human race have polluted & destroyed this earth and its oceans. Now, climate change is here to destroy us!

     

    The Mana Whenua of Aotearoa and Tagata o le Moana in the Pacific are profoundly and intricately connected to the ocean – extending beyond to the non-human & underground worlds too. This is why our narrative is so different from most. We come from cultures where we have only ever known to look after the ocean and even the land, yet we have been the first to inherit the consequences of the previous generations’ destruction to our environment and their failure to take climate action. When I enter the ocean, my indigenous identity magnifies. To you, the ocean is a human asset, but to my people, it is an ecosystem that we are part of, a living and breathing being.  

     

    Without the OCEAN there will be no life on land! Adani’s coal mine in Australia is destroying our ocean. It fuels global warming and will permanently damage our reefs and waters. The magnitude of this destruction has not been addressed with climate action, which is why people worldwide are fighting to Stop Adani. This speaks volumes to us because we are doing the exact same thing now. Holding our own government to account & for them to do their responsibility to protect our futures from being diminished! 

     

    If you say that climate change is not happening now, then you are wrong. 

     

    Climate change is here, it is happening, and I have seen the harmful impacts of it. 

     

    I have seen my families’ livelihoods destroyed right in front of my eyes because of tropical cyclones. 

    I have seen my Nana’s heart crushed while being forced to leave her flooded home because of the intensified heavy downpours. 

    And I have seen my cousins do everything in their power to protect their homes against intensified natural disasters, only to have it swept away. 

    Now can you look me in the eyes and tell me that climate change is not happening?

     

    Jacinda declared climate change as her generations “nuclear-free” moment. But today, we’re all declaring to make this our “fossil-free” moment. 

     

    To our nation’s leaders, where are you? the people sitting in that building right now. You have been way too absent in the fight for climate and for this reason, we are demanding stronger and consistent action NOW. This means implementing legislation that supports the following:

     

    1) To become carbon-neutral by 2050, or sooner.

    2) Limit warming to 1.5- 1.5 to stay alive

    3) To invest more in Fossil fuel Divestment now 

     

    We are demanding you to be adamant and committed to protecting Papatuanuku, Tangaroa and our futures.  There is no time for fear, guilt or blame. We need action and accountability. This is why we are striking. 

     

    When I have children, I want them to grow up and actually have a planet to live on.

     

    Like the oceans, we rise

    Like the oceans, we protect

    Like the oceans, we resist 

     

    Fa’afetai tele lava ma ia manuia,

    Thank you

    by

  • Pasifika Students’ Council (PSC)

    We, as the Pasifika Students’ Council, extend our warm Pacific greetings to you all – to every reader, student and member of our community – we widely welcome and embrace all Pasifika cultures walking in and out of doors of Victoria University of Wellington. The Pasifika Students’ Council (PSC) are the representative group for all Pasifika students at Victoria University of Wellington that provides spiritual, cultural, social and most significantly, academic events throughout the year. If you are an individual who identifies themselves to be of Pacific descent – we are your family. Your aiga. Your system of support to seek for various different aspects of your student experience. 

     

    Our mission statement as the Executive team, is to create a Pasifika home for Pasifika students. Come one, come all. As a team, we work very hard to ensure that as much as a lot of our efforts go towards our own academic studies, we remember that our Pasifika cultures are rooted in honour, genuine inclusion and love for every single Pasifika student of this institution. While we all have contrasting qualities, what binds us together is our support and encouragement for our brown brothers and sisters. This is what highlights our strengths as Pasifika people. While our heritage and roots tie back to different islands scattered across the Pacific ocean, our purpose here at Victoria University is vital for our PSC family to function. 

     

    Founded by Pasifika Pro Vice-Chancellor Luamanuvao Winnie Laban and the Pasifika Students of 2012, the legacy of the Pasifika Students’ Council will underpin the goal of bringing together students’ with prosperous futures with the hopes that we champion the change within our Pacific communities. Our stance in Wellington, even in New Zealand has and will have a ripple effect based on our talents, knowledge and preservation of our different Pacific cultures. 

     

    We look forward to growing our Pasifika community here at Victoria University. We are your vaka. We are with you. We are for you. And we will always stand beside you. 

     

    Fa’afetai tele lava. 

     

    by

  • Kai Fiji

    Ni Sa Bula Vinaka!

    We are KaiFiji and we are the Fijian Students Association on campus here at Victoria University. We are an inclusive people, and our nation comprises of many different cultures. Other than the Itaukei (indigenous people of Fiji), the nation of Fiji also comprises a multiplicity of ethnicities such as Indian, Chinese, and Rotuman. Additionally, a lot of native Fijians have Polynesian ancestry. This diversity throughout the nation of Fiji is a characteristic that strongly defines the culture of our people. We are inclusive of all people and are not just passionate about our people alone, but our culture as well.

    Our association has continued to grow from year to year and we are looking forward to a bright future of cultural and social events that will catalyse and maintain our culture. Our vision moving forward is to reinvigorate and restore a sense of pride in our nation and our culture for the Fijian students that are here in Wellington to study. We also aim to develop a relationship within the Fijian community here in Wellington.

    This year, we will be creating a cultural performance group with hopes that this group can be a pillar to connect people to our culture and an instrument to sustain our culture within New Zealand. The practices for our cultural performance group will include learning the traditional Fijian dance which is better known as the ‘Meke’ and a few Fijian songs that we plan to showcase at the end of this trimester, to commemorate not just Fijian Language Week held Oct 6–12, but also Fiji’s Independence Day on October 10.

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